Browse Exhibits (19 total)

History of New Paltz in Objects

“You take an object…and you put it down in front of you and you start. You begin to tell a story.”

Edmund de Waal, The Hare with Amber Eyes 

This exhibition brings together a collection of artifacts, tools, knick-knacks, books, clothing, and other items that collectively tell the stories of New Paltz, New York. Today the site of a vibrant college, a favorite location for artists, outdoor enthusiasts, and quiet weekend retreats, New Paltz has a history that reaches back through the earliest records of American history and culture. It was once a crossroads in trade roads and hunting grounds for the region’s Native American cultures. Settled by Europeans in the seventeenth century, "Die Pfaltz" quickly developed into a thriving early American community. This place has thus witnessed a span of major historical events that have defined the American experience, from the Revolutionary War and slavery to the Vietnam protests of the twentieth century.

By its nature, the narrative we tell here is neither complete nor exhaustive. Based on the materials of history, what these stories share is a sense of dimension, extension, and richness: a button made in seventeenth-century Amsterdam that may have been a trading item between settlers and Indians; an autograph book that records the social circle of a nineteenth-century college woman; a collection of worn t-shirts that document the establishment of college radio in New York.

This collaborative material history grew from Cyrus Mulready’s Spring 2013 Honors Seminar at SUNY New Paltz. You can read more in the following links about the class and project. It has also been conducted in collaboration with several local institutions and individuals: Dr. Joseph Diamond of the SUNY New Paltz department of Anthropology, the Haviland-Heidgerd Collection at Elting Memorial Library in New Paltz, Historic Huguenot Street, The Sojourner Truth Library at SUNY New Paltz, and the Southeastern New York Library Resources Council

Quilts of Historic Huguenot Street

Every experience deeply felt in life needs to be passed along - whether it be through words and music, chiseled in stone, painted with a brush, or sewn with a needle, it is a way of reaching for immortality.

                                       ~Thomas Jefferson

 

Franklin D. Roosevelt's Family History in New York's Hudson Valley

Franklin D. Roosevelt was proud of his heritage and family name. He idealized and strived to assume the gallant qualities he saw in his ancestry - generations of which he learned about from family stories passed down, and from the papers they left behind. Like his legendary stamp collection, FDR collected, sorted, and cared for the records of the Delano and Roosevelt families.

Told here are the stories of several generations of Roosevelts and Delanos who worked hard to prosper and establish the prominence now associated with their names. Their voices and deeds are captured within the following selection of correspondence, accounts, estate papers and public announcements. These documents, once held by President Roosevelt, now in the collection of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum, simultaneously tell the history of settling on the banks of the Hudson River and the rise of two of the Hudson River Valley’s great families.

The items featured in this exhibit are a selection of digitized historical materials contributed to HRVH.org by the FDR Library. 

Women of the Hudson Valley

This exhibit highlights resources availalbe in several digital collections in Hudson River Valley Heritage.

The following organizations contributed to this exhibit: Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection at Elting Memorial Library, Historic Huguenot Street, Historical Society of the Town of Warwick, Nyack Library, Vassar College, Locust Grove/Locust Lawn Farm, Woodstock Artists Association and Museum and Women's Studio Workshop.

The School Letters of Rachel Eltinge, 1863-1865

Rachel Eltinge, born in 1847 in New Paltz, NY, began attending the Poughkeepsie Female Academy in 1863.

During her stay at the Academy she wrote numerous letters to her friends and family, describing everything from mundane daily tasks to important local events. The information exchanged between Rachel and the people most dear to her reveal the simple yet fascinating aspects of living in a time so different from our own.

This exhibit not only features Rachel Eltinge’s correspondences but also family photographs and genealogy, giving both clarity and life to words on paper.The letters and images found in this exhibit were generously donated to Historic Huguenot Street by Helena LeFevre.

All of the digitized materials in the Rachel Eltinge Collection are available on the Hudson River Valley Heritage website. Selected items from the collection are featured throughout this exhibit.

Credits

This exhbit was created by Susan Stessin-Cohn, Ashley Hurlburt, Kate Long, Jeff Warren and Carole Ford.

Linking Collections, Building Connections: Works from the Hudson Valley Visual Art Consortium Collections

August 24 – December 11, 2011

Morgan Anderson Gallery, Howard Greenberg Family Gallery, and Corridor Gallery

Bringing to light over 150 artworks and the myriad connections that link them together, this exhibition presents fresh perspectives on a century of artistic activity in the Mid-Hudson Valley. The exhibition gathers together paintings, sculptures, furnishings, prints, drawings, photographs, conceptual works, and documentation and ephemera from the permanent collections of the partner organizations of the Hudson Valley Visual Art Collections Consortium (HVVACC).

Marlboro Free Library 100 Years Celebration(1911-2011)

The Marlboro Free Library has been serving it's community for a 100 years (1911-2011). This exhibit portrays the different locations of the library in the town of Marlboro, NY over the years from December 9, 1911 to the present, as well as providing a history timeline.

From My Pen and Power

For nearly four decades, Julia Lawrence Hasbrouck diligently kept a diary, using it to chronicle her role and responsibilities as a 19th century wife, mother and daughter. Julia’s meticulous entries, written between 1838 to 1873, reflect her opinions and views of these experiences. Her seventeen diaries, as well as daguerreotypes, portraits, school composition books, piano forte sheet music and two diaries kept by Julia's daughter, comprise The Julia Lawrence Hasbrouck Collection. The chronological scope of Julia's writing paired with her descriptive and personal style, provide a detailed account of private and public life of the early Victorian era as experienced by a white, middle class, northern woman.

The Life and Death of Leah Catharine Deyo Jessup

Leah Catharine Deyo was born in New Paltz, NY in 1818 and resided in the Hudson Valley until her death in 1849. 

John and Katia Jacobs, descendants of Leah Catharine preserved a collection of her correspondence, daguerreotypes, clothing and photographs. They generously donated it to the Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection at the Elting Library in the 1980s.

This exhibit chronicles different aspects of Leah Catharine's life and offers a glimpse into the daily life of a mid-nineteenth century woman.

All of the digitized materials in the Leah Catharine Deyo Jessup Collection are available on the Hudson River Valley Heritage website. Selected items from the collection are featured throughout this exhibit.