Browse Exhibits (31 total)

Binary Visions

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Presented by Historic Huguenot Street, this exhibit highlights a sampling of the dozens of such textiles in the Permanent Collection all of which were produced locally in Ulster, Dutchess, and Orange county. Through their actual woven patterns (symbols and texts) and through related records and tools, these coverlets carry clear connections to the local families that purchased and used them.

Camp Awosting

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Camp Awosting was founded in 1900 by Dr. Walter Truslow, member of the Kings County Medical Society of Brooklyn, New York, and Blake Hillyer, president of the executive committee of the Physical Education Society of New York. Originally established in what is now Minnewaska State Park, New York, the camp now operates in Bantam Lake, Connecticut. Since 2010, it has been run by the Ebner family.

Campers were encouraged to “rough it” and embrace the rugged, natural landscape located at the crest of the Shawangunk Mountain range, in order to offset the “softening effect of the modern city.” The woods, weathered cliffs, and mile-long shore provided the boys with a healthy life in the wilderness.

Traditional male characteristics such as physical strength, discipline, and teamwork were the characteristic building blocks for which camp activities, sports, and events were based.

As many boys came from affluent urban communities, summers at Awosting provided them with a more rustic environment at an age when testosterone ran free and competition reached an all-time high. Camp provided well-to-do, adolescent boys with the means for a healthy and physical upbringing. Parents sent their sons here to receive lessons that they believed could not be taught or learned in their own communities. The boys were given the chance to escape their everyday lives and the opportunity to live among their friends in the Hudson River Valley for two summer months under the guidance and supervision of counselors.

Emily DuBois Hoysradt

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Emily DuBois Hoysradt led an active life, devoted to art, learning, and participation in several community organizations.

Franklin D. Roosevelt's Family History in New York's Hudson Valley

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Franklin D. Roosevelt was proud of his heritage and family name. He idealized and strived to assume the gallant qualities he saw in his ancestry - generations of which he learned about from family stories passed down, and from the papers they left behind. Like his legendary stamp collection, FDR collected, sorted, and cared for the records of the Delano and Roosevelt families.

Told here are the stories of several generations of Roosevelts and Delanos who worked hard to prosper and establish the prominence now associated with their names. Their voices and deeds are captured within the following selection of correspondence, accounts, estate papers and public announcements. These documents, once held by President Roosevelt, now in the collection of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum, simultaneously tell the history of settling on the banks of the Hudson River and the rise of two of the Hudson River Valley’s great families.

The items featured in this exhibit are a selection of digitized historical materials contributed to New York Heritage by the FDR Library. 

From My Pen and Power

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For nearly four decades, Julia Lawrence Hasbrouck diligently kept a diary, using it to chronicle her role and responsibilities as a 19th century wife, mother and daughter. Julia’s meticulous entries, written between 1838 to 1873, reflect her opinions and views of these experiences. Her seventeen diaries, as well as daguerreotypes, portraits, school composition books, piano forte sheet music and two diaries kept by Julia's daughter, comprise The Julia Lawrence Hasbrouck Collection. The chronological scope of Julia's writing paired with her descriptive and personal style, provide a detailed account of private and public life of the early Victorian era as experienced by a white, middle class, northern woman.

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Hendrick Aupaumut

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This exhibition features a letter to the New York State Legislature from Hendrick Aupaumut, Mohican sachem (traditional leader) and diplomat. The letter was received as a gift to the Historic Huguenot Street Archives by Mary Frances Stokes-Jensen in 2016.

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Holiday Menus

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Many of our favorite holiday celebrations are centered around food. Even if our traditional meals vary, food and holidays go hand in hand. As part of these celebrations, restaurants and hotels often produced special menus for holiday meals. Compared to the daily menu, these holiday menus were elaborately designed and listed some of the finest foods that were being served at that time and place.

This online exhibit presents a selection of historical holiday menus from The Culinary Institute of America Menu Collection. Each menu reflects the way people celebrated holidays in the past. First, notice the designs of these menus, which often reflect the celebratory nature of the holiday. Then, look at the items on the menus and you will see a lot of traditional foods that are still associated with the holiday today. Some menus offer a special fixed price meal, while others offer an a la carte menu. Some list the evening's entertainment and some include drink lists. Most importantly, these menus encourage diners to eat, drink, and be merry.

We hope you enjoy this selection of holiday menus. As the year progresses, we will be adding more holidays and more menus, so be sure to check back often.


About the collection

The Culinary Institute of America's special collection of 30,000 menus includes menus from CIA restaurants, along with gifts from major menu collectors, including George Lang, Chapman S. Root, Vinnie Oakes, Roy Andries de Groot, and the Smiley family of Mohonk Mountain House. Assembled over decades, the collection illustrates the history of dining in America and abroad, with menus from all of the states and over 100 countries, as well as ships, railroads, and airlines.

The CIA menus are part of the CIA Archives and Special Collections, housed in the Conrad N. Hilton Library. Anyone interested in learning more about the collection or locating specific menus should contact Nicole Semenchuk at n_semenc@culinary.edu.

Hudson River Day Line

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This exhibit highlights the history and vessels of the passenger steamboat line, Hudson River Day Line. The Hudson River Day Line was the most famous of the Hudson River steamboat lines carrying millions of passengers over the decades on excursion trips from New York to Albany and points in between on fast, beautifully appointed steamers.

Jacob Wynkoop

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Jacob Wynkoop “never was a slave” as his forebears had been.[1] He was born in the rural community of New Paltz, New York, in 1829, two years after slavery was legally abolished in the state. Jacob had an exceptional and varied life for any man of his time, black or white. Among the first African Americans to buy land in the community, he also served in the Union Army during the Civil War, organized politically on behalf of Black citizens in town, and built a series of homes that today still define a neighborhood in the village of New Paltz. Unlike countless other Africans and African Americans from the dawn of European colonization through the 19th century and beyond, Jacob’s story is fairly well documented in the historical record.

This exhibit was curated by Josephine Bloodgood, Director of Curatorial and Preservation Affairs, Historic Huguenot Street.

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Jane Deyo Wynkoop

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Born to an enslaved woman in New Paltz, New York, Jane has a remarkable story. Through original archival documents, this exhibit explores her story from birth in 1803 to death in 1876, at age 73.

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